Studying the Acute-to-Chronic Pain Transition in Perioperative Patients (310)

1:45 PM–2:45 PM Saturday, February 29

Surgical injury typically results in some acute pain but, importantly, also affords a chance of transition into chronic pain and opioid use. This panel will provide a brief overview of the basic mechanisms underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain, with emphasis on pain centralization and psychosocial modulation.

One Protocol Does Not Fit All: Measuring Differences in Pain Processing to Guide Perioperative Care

Kristin Schreiber

When the Pain Really Is in Your Head: How Fibromyalgianess Influences Analgesic Response to Lumbar Spine Surgery and Interventional Pain Procedures

Andrea Nicol

Balancing Opioid Minimization and Optimal Perioperative Pain Management

Jennifer Hah

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the tremendous variability in pain processing between individuals, which may be partially predicted using brief, well-validated preoperative assessment tools.
  • Illustrate that fibromyalgianess is not just a silly made-up word—it is a concept that time and time again has shown to lead to greater understandings of how centralized pain influences analgesic outcomes from peripherally directed interventions.
  • Determine that risk factors for chronic postoperative pain and opioids are only partially overlapping, and targeted interventions for one outcome may not passively impact the other.
Moderator:

Andrea Nicol

Co-Presenters:

Kristin Schreiber

Jennifer Hah